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Tables

Table 1: Energy Savings and CO2 Impacts
Recycling and Incineration

Energy Savings Per Ton Recycled

Energy Generated
Per Ton Incinerated

Materials Grade % Reduction of Energy* Million BTUs Equivalent in Barrels of Oil Tons CO2 Reduced Million BTUs Equivalent in Barrels of Oil
Aluminum
95 196 37.2 13.8 -1.06 -0.2
Paper** Newsprint
Print/Writing
Linerboard
Boxboard
45
35
26
26.
20.9
20.8
12.3
12.8
3.97
3.95
2.34
2.43
-0.03
-0.03
0.07
0.04
11.8
11.8
11.8
11.8
2.24
2.24
2.24
2.24
Glass Recycle
Reuse
31
328
4.74
50.18
0.9
9.54
0.39
3.46
-0.34
na
-0.06
na
Steel
61 14.3 2.71 1.52 -0.34 -0.06
Plastic PET
PE
PP
57
75
74
57.9
56.7
53.6
11
10.8
10.2
0.985
0.346
1.32
35.9
35.9
38.5
6.8
6.8
7.3
Mixed MSW
na na na na 10 1.9

Estimates derived from data supplied by Argonne National Labs (1980, 1981), DOE (1982),
Franklin Associates (1990), AL Associates, AISI, Phillips 66, Wellman (1991). Conversions
based on data from Love (1974), CRC (1978), Perry (1984), EIS (1990).

* Relative to energy required for virgin production
** Energy calculations for paper recycling count unused wood as fuel
na = not applicable




TABLE 2: Recovery Rates for Materials Found in the U.S. Municipal Waste Stream

Recovery as percent
of generation
Paper and paperboard 35.3%
Glass 23.4%
Metals
Ferrous metals
32.3%
Aluminum
37.6%
Other nonferrous metals
66.1%
Total metals
35.9%
Plastics 4.7%
Rubber and leather 7.1%
Textiles 11.7%
Wood 9.8%
Other materials 20.9%
Total materials in products 25.9%
Other waste
Food waste
3.4%
Yard trimmings
22.9%
Total other wastes
15.7%
TOTAL MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE 23.6%[194]



Notes

194. Excerpted from Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: 1995 Update (Washington, D.C.: EPA, March 1996), at p.6.