Environmental Issues: Wildlands

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All Documents in Wildlands Tagged wildlife

Stop the Slaughter
Yellowstone’s Buffalo Herd Must Be Protected

Fact Sheet
The Montana Department of Livestock and the National Park Service are killing the thousands of buffalo that roam in Yellowstone National Park, claiming with little evidence that the buffalo could transmit disease to cattle in the area. NRDC is fighting to protect Yellowstone buffalo from senseless killing and to safeguard the park’s wildlife resources for future generations. Get document in pdf.
Morro Bay-Cayucos Sewage Treatment Plant and Sea Otter Habitat
Fact Sheet
The Morro Bay/Cayucos sewage plant in California has dumped pollutants into the ocean for more than two decades -- directly into bay waters that are a hotspot for deaths among the threatened California sea otter.  Officials at the Morro Bay sewage plant do not intend to complete an upgrade to meet basic federal standards until March 2014, even as the plant's own documents show that a faster, more efficient, less expensive upgrade is possible.
Strip Mining for Oil in Endangered Forests
Fact Sheet
Big oil interests are scraping away hundreds of thousands of acres in North America’s Boreal forest to produce tar sands oil, and in the process consuming large amounts of natural gas and generating three times as much global warming pollution as conventional crude oil production. Greater efficiency and renewable fuels are far better, cleaner ways to meet our energy needs. Get document in pdf.
End of the Road: The Adverse Ecological Impacts of Roads and Logging
A Compilation of Independently Reviewed Research

Report
An annotated bibliography providing an overview of primary research, almost all from peer-reviewed journals, documenting the adverse impacts of roads and logging on North American forest ecosystems.

Documents Tagged wildlife in All Sections

Consequences of Global Warming
Overview
A hotter planet means dirtier air and water, more severe floods and droughts, more wildfires and other serious consequences.
Non-Lethal Methods to Prevent Conflicts Between Predators and Livestock
Fact Sheet
Every year, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Wildlife Services program kills thousands of predators as a taxpayer-funded subsidy to the livestock industry, using controversial and inhumane methods such as poisons and aerial gunning. Wildlife Services largely ignores the many non-lethal ways to prevent conflicts between predators and livestock. In fact, a small, but growing number of ranchers are turning away from Wildlife Services’ “sledgehammer” approach and emphasizing non-lethal conflict-prevention techniques because they recognize that predators are an integral part of the landscapes where they ranch. Get document in pdf.
Reform Wildlife Services' Predator Control
Why does the government continue to kill public wildlife for private interests?

Overview
Wildlife Services spends over $100 million annually to kill more than one million animals.   Some of its work, such as preventing bird strikes at airports and controlling the spread of rabies, benefits the public interest, but its current predator control program damages the environment and wastes taxpayer dollars.
Sharing the Range
A Place for Wild Bison on Today’s Landscape

Fact Sheet
Tens of millions of wild plains bison once roamed the grasslands of North America, but the slaughter of the late 1800s so devastated the famous herds that at one time only a few dozen animals remained in the wild, tucked away in a remote valley in Yellowstone National Park. Though they have since bounced back from the brink of extinction, today the vast majority of bison in the United States are raised as livestock on private property. But there is great potential for restoring wild bison to the landscape, and living with bison is possible. The Natural Resources Defense Council believes it is time to recover bison as a wildlife species and give wild bison more habitat—room to roam in the American West. Get document in pdf.

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