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Climate change is literally killing us. According to NRDC's "Killer Summer Heat" report, more than 150,000 Americans could die by the end of this century due to the excessive heat caused by climate change. And that estimate only covers America's top 40 cities.

Why will climate change cause so many casualties? Illnesses that are caused or made worse by extreme heat -- including heat exhaustion, heat stroke, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease -- currently lead to hundreds of deaths each year.

As carbon pollution continues to rise, the number of dangerously hot days each summer will increase even further, leading to a dramatic increase in the number of lives lost.

While everyone in these urban areas is at risk, children and the elderly are the most vulnerable.

Click the map icons to find out how many MORE heat-related deaths climate change could cause in the top 40 U.S. cities.

  • Atlanta, GA

    Atlanta, GA

    Climate change modeling indicates that Atlanta, Georgia could experience 756 fewer heat-related deaths by 2099.

  • Baltimore, MD

    Baltimore, MD

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 2,000 more heat-related deaths in Baltimore, Maryland by 2099.

  • Birmingham, AL

    Birmingham, AL

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Birmingham, Alabama by 2099.

  • Boston, MA

    Boston, MA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 5,000 more heat-related deaths in Boston, Massachusetts by 2099.

  • Buffalo, NY

    Buffalo, NY

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 3,000 more heat-related deaths in Buffalo, New York by 2099.

  • Chicago, IL

    Chicago, IL

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 6,000 more heat-related deaths in Chicago, Illinois by 2099.

  • Cincinnati, OH

    Cincinnati, OH

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 800 more heat-related deaths in Cincinnati, Ohio by 2099.

  • Cleveland, OH

    Cleveland, OH

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 16,000 more heat-related deaths in Cleveland, Ohio by 2099.

  • Columbus, OH

    Columbus, OH

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 6,000 more heat-related deaths in Columbus, Ohio by 2099.

  • Dallas, TX

    Dallas, TX

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 7,000 more heat-related deaths in Dallas, Texas by 2099.

  • Denver, CO

    Denver, CO

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 3,000 more heat-related deaths in Denver, Colorado by 2099.

  • Detroit, MI

    Detroit, MI

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 17,000 more heat-related deaths in Detroit, Michigan by 2099.

  • Greensboro, NC

    Greensboro, NC

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Greensboro, North Carolina by 2099.

  • Hartford, CT

    Hartford, CT

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Hartford, Connecticut by 2099.

  • Houston, TX

    Houston, TX

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Houston, Texas by 2099.

  • Indianapolis, IN

    Indianapolis, IN

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 2,000 more heat-related deaths in Indianapolis, Indiana by 2099.

  • Jacksonville, FL

    Jacksonville, FL

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 8,000 more heat-related deaths in Jacksonville, Florida by 2099.

  • Kansas City, MO

    Kansas City, MO

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 4,000 more heat-related deaths in Kansas City, Missouri by 2099.

  • Los Angeles, CA

    Los Angeles, CA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Los Angeles, California by 2099.

  • Louisville, KY

    Louisville, KY

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 18,000 more heat-related deaths in Louisville, Kentucky by 2099.

  • Memphis, TN

    Memphis, TN

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 10,000 more heat-related deaths in Memphis, Tennessee by 2099.

  • Miami, FL

    Miami, FL

    Climate change modeling indicates that Miami, Florida may not experience any additional heat-related deaths by 2099.

  • Minneapolis, MN

    Minneapolis, MN

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 7,000 more heat-related deaths in Minneapolis, Minnesota by 2099.

  • New Orleans, LA

    New Orleans, LA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in New Orleans, Louisiana by 2099.

  • New York, NY

    New York, NY

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in New York, New York by 2099.

  • Newark, NJ

    Newark, NJ

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Newark, New Jersey by 2099.

  • Philadelphia, PA

    Philadelphia, PA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 700 more heat-related deaths in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania by 2099.

  • Phoenix, AZ

    Phoenix, AZ

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 2,000 more heat-related deaths in Phoenix, Arizona by 2099.

  • Pittsburgh, PA

    Pittsburgh, PA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 1,000 more heat-related deaths in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania by 2099.

  • Portland, OR

    Portland, OR

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 700 more heat-related deaths in Portland, Oregon by 2099.

  • Providence, RI

    Providence, RI

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 2,000 more heat-related deaths in Providence, Rhode Island by 2099.

  • Salt Lake, UT

    Salt Lake, UT

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 100 more heat-related deaths in Salt Lake, Utah by 2099.

  • San Antonio, TX

    San Antonio, TX

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 600 more heat-related deaths in San Antonio, Texas by 2099.

  • San Diego, CA

    San Diego, CA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 300 more heat-related deaths in San Diego, California by 2099.

  • San Francisco, CA

    San Francisco, CA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 200 more heat-related deaths in San Francisco, California by 2099.

  • San Jose, CA

    San Jose, CA

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 200 more heat-related deaths in San Jose, California by 2099.

  • Seattle, WA

    Seattle, WA

    Climate change modeling indicates that Seattle, Washington could experience 125 fewer heat-related deaths by 2099.

  • St. Louis, MO

    St. Louis, MO

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 5,000 more heat-related deaths in St. Louis, Missouri by 2099.

  • Tampa, FL

    Tampa, FL

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 300 more heat-related deaths in Tampa, Florida by 2099.

  • Washington, DC

    Washington, DC

    Rising temperatures driven by climate change could cause over 2,000 more heat-related deaths in Washington, DC by 2099.

Source: Killer Summer Heat: The Death Toll from Rising Temperatures in America Due to Climate Change, a new report by NRDC

Why Is Extreme Heat Dangerous?

Scientists expect that average temperatures in North America will rise by another 4°F -11°F this century. The risks to public health are greatest when high temperatures mix with other weather conditions to cause what's known as an "Excessive Heat Event," or EHE. EHE days occur when a location's temperature, dew point temperature, cloud cover, wind speed and surface atmospheric pressure throughout the day combine to cause or contribute to heat-related deaths in that location.

Health impacts spike during excessive heat events. For example, when California was hit by deadly heat waves in 2006, the heat caused during a two-week period 655 deaths, 1,620 excess hospitalizations, and more than 16,000 additional emergency room visits, resulting in nearly $5.4 billion in costs. During a 1995 record-setting heat wave in Chicago, over 700 people died due to the excessive heat.

EHE days vary by region and location. Factors such as geography, green space, local warning and preventive measures affect how much impact the weather will actually have on health.

To limit the health impacts of climate change, we need to reduce carbon pollution from top sources like power plants and refineries. The EPA has taken its first big step toward setting limits for industrial carbon sources by proposing limits on carbon pollution from new power plants. Please join us in supporting this important step, and urging the EPA to take the next step by setting limits on carbon from other sources as well.

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