Environmental News: Media Center

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press contact: Suzanne Struglinski, sstruglinski@nrdc.org (202)289-2387
If you are not a member of the press, please write to us at nrdcinfo@nrdc.org or see our contact page
20 Surveys: Strong Opposition Nationally and in Key Districts to U.S. House Members' Actions to Block Public Health Protections
National Survey Shows Bipartisan Public Support for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

WASHINGTON (February 23, 2011) – A strong majority of registered voters across the United States – including those in all 19 key Congressional Districts polled – oppose the U.S. House votes last week to block the Environmental Protection Agency from updating clean air safeguards needed to protect the health of Americans, according to major new Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey results released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

The survey results show that all 19 of the House members – including U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Tea Party leader Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn – who supported blocking the EPA are out of step with their constituents.

Nationwide, about six out of 10 Americans (58 percent) – including 55 percent of Independents and roughly half (48 percent) of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution,” according to the survey of 784 registered voters conducted February18-20, 2011 by PPP for NRDC.  Additionally, more than two thirds of Americans (68 percent) – including 54 percent of Republicans and 59 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

In separate surveys conducted in 19 Congressional Districts, PPP asked registered voters if they agreed with their member of Congress’ decision to vote for legislation barring the EPA from updating clean air safeguards.  In all 19 districts polled, respondents across the political spectrum said they oppose their representative’s votes to handcuff the EPA and think instead that Congress should let the agency do its job of protecting public health and the environment.

The average level of public opposition to the anti-EPA votes across the 19 Congressional Districts was 66 percent – including 45 percent of Republicans and 62 percent of Independents.  For a full overview of the 19 surveys, go to http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/paltman/2-23%20Poll%20Table.pdf.

PPP polled registered voters in the following Congressional districts in eight states:  Illinois (Reps. Joe Walsh, IL-8, Robert Dold, IL-10, and Bobby Schilling, IL-17); Michigan (Reps. Daniel Benishek, MI-1, and Mike Rogers, MI-8); Minnesota (Reps. Michele Bachmann, MN-6, and Chip Cravaack, MN-8);  Montana (Rep. Denny Rehberg (MT-At Large); Ohio (House Speaker John Boehner, OH-8, and Reps. Patrick Tiberi, OH-12, and Jim Renacci, OH-16); Pennsylvania (Reps. Jason Altmire, PA-4, Jim Gerlach, PA-6, Patrick Meehan, PA-7, Lou Barletta, PA-11); Virginia  (Reps. Robert Hurt, VA-5, Scott Rigell, VA-2); and Wisconsin (Reps. Reid Ribble, WI-8, and Sean Duffy, WI-7).

"The message here is as clear as clean air: In every district we polled, Americans want their elected representatives to let the EPA do its job instead of putting the profit-driven agenda of big polluters ahead of the health of their children," said Peter Altman, Climate Campaign Director for the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Politicians who are considering blocking the EPA and updates to Clean Air Act safeguards should understand that doing so is very unpopular. Americans know where these actions will lead and they want their kids to be able to grow up breathing clean air.”

“Americans are clearly persuaded that their health needs should take priority over the profits of polluters” said Tom Jensen, director of Public Policy Polling. "Political affiliation doesn’t appear to count for much when constituents are asked whether their representatives in Congress should be siding with the public’s health or the political clout of polluters.”

The national and 19 Congressional District findings are consistent with national polling released over the last few weeks by the American Lung Association http://www.lungusa.org/about-us/our-impact/top-stories/clean-air-survey.html and the Natural Resources Defense Council  http://www.nrdc.org/media/2011/110210.asp and http://www.nrdc.org/media/2011/110202.asp.

The poll was timed to ask several questions about positions lawmakers took during last week’s debate over the federal budget. During that debate, House members cast a number of votes that would severely limit the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to protect public health from water and air pollution. The Continuing Resolution (CR) itself cut 30 percent of the EPA’s budget. The CR also contained policy provisions to block EPA from setting limits for carbon dioxide pollution. In addition, several amendments were passed that also would block the EPA from doing its job of protecting public health, including Representative Ted Poe’s (R-TX) amendment to bar the EPA from taking any actions to reduce carbon dioxide pollution for any reason, Representative John Carter’s (R-TX) amendment to prevent the EPA from reducing toxic pollution such as arsenic and mercury from cement kilns and Representative Mike Pompeo’s amendment to prevent EPA from collecting data about carbon and other pollution.

Keeping with tradition, Speaker of the House John Boehner did not actually vote on the bill or the amendments, but supported the bill’s passage as amended. Every other member whose district was polled voted for the EPA-blocking amendments, and every member except for Rep. Jason Altmire (D-PA) voted for the final package. 

For more information on how individual members voted and how the votes put public health at risk, see http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/paltman/19%20Member%20Votes%20on%20CR.pdf   and http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/paltman/strong_opposition_nationally_a.html.  

FINDINGS FROM NATIONAL SURVEY 

The national survey of American registered voters also showed the following

·         69 percent of Americans – including 59 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents – think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         64 percent of Americans – including 57 percent of Republicans and 63 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only about a third of Americans (36 percent). 

·         One of the poll questions revealed particularly strong support for clean air updates the EPA is putting forward today: 66 percent of Americans -- including 54 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Independents -- favor the EPA requiring stricter limits on the amount of toxic chemicals such as mercury, lead, and arsenic that coal power plants and other industrial facilities release.

·         78 percent of Americans – including 69 percent of Republicans and 74 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

 ·         66 percent support “requiring stricter limits on the amount of toxic chemicals such as mercury, lead, and arsenic that coal power plants and other industrial facilities release.”

 ·         65 percent support “limiting the amount of carbon pollution that big power plants and other industrial facilities release.”

·         64 percent favor “requiring stricter limits on the amount of smog that vehicles and industrial facilities release.”

FINDINGS FOR CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS

The following 19 Congressional Districts illustrate the broad public support for the Environmental Protection Agency and the EPA’s planned updates to key anti-pollution safeguards for the protection of the health of Americans:

Illinois -- Rep. Joe Walsh, IL-8, 571 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 4.1%

·         68 percent – including 60 percent of Independents and 57 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         73 percent – including 62 percent of Republicans and 63 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         80 percent – including 74 percent of Republicans and 77 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         76 percent   – including 65 percent of Republicans and 73 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 24 percent.

·         83 percent – including 74 percent of Republicans and 81 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Illinois – Rep. Robert Dold, IL-10, 690 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.7%

·         74 percent – including 69 percent of Independents and 53 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         77 percent -- including 65 percent of Republicans and 75 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         80 percent – including 67 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         77 percent – including 62 percent of Republicans and 78 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 23 percent.

·         83 percent – including 75 percent of Republicans and 79 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Illinois – Rep. Bobby Schilling, IL-17, 931 registered voters, 2/19-2/20, margin of error 3.2%

·         65 percent – including 64 percent of Independents and 46 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         71 percent -- including 59 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         76 percent – including 65 percent of Republicans and 75 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         73 percent   – including 60 percent of Republicans and 65 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 27 percent.

·         81 percent – including 72 percent of Republicans and 76 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Michigan - Rep. Daniel Benishek, MI-1, 1,135 registered voters, 2/20-2/21, margin of error 2.9%

·         62 percent – including 55 percent of Independents and 42 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         66 percent -- including 52 percent of Republicans and 57 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         74 percent – including 63 percent of Republicans and 67 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         69 percent of Americans – including 56 percent of Republicans and 60 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 31 percent.

·         78 percent – including 69 percent of Republicans and 73 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Michigan - Rep. Mike Rogers, MI-8, 754 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.6%

·         64 percent – including 63 percent of Independents and 40 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         67 percent -- including 45 percent of Republicans and 66 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         77 percent – including 61 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         74 percent   – including 60 percent of Republicans and 73 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 26 percent.

·         80 percent – including 63 percent of Republicans and 82 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Minnesota - Rep. Michele Bachmann, MN-6, 956 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.2%

·         64 percent – including 60 percent of Independents and 35 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         69 percent -- including 47 percent of Republicans and 65 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         73 percent – including 58 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         70 percent – including 50 percent of Republicans and 66 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 30 percent.

·         78 percent – including 60 percent of Republicans and 76 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Minnesota – Rep. Chip Cravaack, MN-8, 1,022 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.1%

·         67 percent – including 58 percent of Independents and 36 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         69 percent -- including 38 percent of Republicans and 60 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         73 percent – including 53 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         71 percent of Americans – including 50 percent of Republicans and 63 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 29 percent.

·         79 percent – including 57 percent of Republicans and 74 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Montana - Rep. Denny Rehberg, MT-At Large, 1,065 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3%

·         58 percent – including 54 percent of Independents and 32 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         58 percent -- including 32 percent of Republicans and 50 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         67 percent – including 39 percent of Republicans and 63 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         62 percent   – including 41 percent of Republicans and 60 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 38 percent.

·         72 percent – including 56 percent of Republicans and 67 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Ohio - U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, OH-8, 805 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.5%

·         56 percent – including 51 percent of Independents and 37 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         62 percent -- including 49 percent of Republicans and 55 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         71 percent – including 60 percent of Republicans and 67 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         66 percent   – including 56 percent of Republicans and 60 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 34 percent.

·         75 percent – including 66 percent of Republicans and 71 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Ohio -- Rep. Patrick Tiberi, OH-12, 729 registered voters, 2/20-2/21, margin of error 3.6%

·         65 percent – including 57 percent of Independents and 44 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         67 percent -- including 48 percent of Republicans and 57 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         73 percent – including 58 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         69 percent   – including 57 percent of Republicans and 57 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 31 percent.

·         77 percent – including 63 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Ohio - Rep. Jim Renacci, OH-16, 705 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.7%

·         59 percent – including 48 percent of Independents and 41 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         64 percent -- including 48 percent of Republicans and 50 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         71 percent – including 57 percent of Republicans and 62 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         68 percent   – including 52 percent of Republicans and 59 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 32 percent.

·         76 percent – including 65 percent of Republicans and 64 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Pennsylvania - Rep. Jason Altmire, P-4, 867 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.3%

·         61 percent – including 56 percent of Independents and 46 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         66 percent -- including 52 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         72 percent – including 64 percent of Republicans and 62 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         70 percent   – including 60 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 30 percent.

·         80 percent – including 71 percent of Republicans and 66 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Pennsylvania – Rep. Jim Gerlach, PA-6, 839 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.4%

·         72 percent – including 69 percent of Independents and 48 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         76 percent -- including 57 percent of Republicans and 74 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         78 percent – including 62 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         76 percent of Americans – including 58 percent of Republicans and 67 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 24 percent.

·         86 percent – including 75 percent of Republicans and 83 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Pennsylvania – Rep. Patrick Meehan, PA-7, 542 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 4.2%

·         76 percent – including 80 percent of Independents and 57 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         80 percent -- including 62 percent of Republicans and 76 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         84 percent – including 79 percent of Republicans and 79 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         80 percent   – including 69 percent of Republicans and 77 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 20 percent.

·         87 percent – including 76 percent of Republicans and 83 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Pennsylvania – Rep. Lou Barletta, PA-11, 859 registered voters, 2/20-2/21, margin of error 3.3%

·         70 percent – including 58 percent of Independents and 53 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         79 percent -- including 68 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         82 percent – including 75 percent of Republicans and 76 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         79 percent   – including 68 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 21 percent.

·         88 percent – including 82 percent of Republicans and 84 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Virginia - Rep. Robert Hurt, VA-5, 767 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 3.5%

·         68 percent – including 69 percent of Independents and 37 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         73 percent -- including 55 percent of Republicans and 64 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         74 percent – including 61 percent of Republicans and 72 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         73 percent – including 52 percent of Republicans and 70 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 27 percent.

·         83 percent – including 64 percent of Republicans and 80 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Virginia – Rep. Scott Rigell, VA-2, 556 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 4.2%

·         66 percent – including 67 percent of Independents and 49 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         74 percent -- including 62 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         79 percent – including 75 percent of Republicans and 73 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         79 percent   – including 70 percent of Republicans and 71 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 21 percent.

·         81 percent – including 71 percent of Republicans and 77 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Wisconsin -- Rep. Reid Ribble, WI-8, 1,398 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 2.6%

·         64 percent – including 60 percent of Independents and 46 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         70 percent -- including 60 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         74 percent – including 69 percent of Republicans and 69 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         71 percent  – including 63 percent of Republicans and 65 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 29 percent.

·         79 percent – including 72 percent of Republicans and 75 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

Wisconsin – Rep. Sean Duffy, WI-7, 1,578 registered voters, 2/18-2/19, margin of error 2.5%

·         62 percent – including 55 percent of Independents and 37 percent of Republicans – oppose the U.S. House vote to “block the EPA from limiting carbon dioxide pollution.”

·         66 percent -- including 44 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of Independents -- said the EPA should move ahead to “reduce carbon pollution without delay.”

·         74 percent – including 64 percent of Republicans and 66 percent of Independents -- think EPA scientists, not Congress, should decide what pollution limits are needed.

·         69 percent – including 51 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Independents -- think “Congress should let the EPA do its job” versus “Congress should decide when and how greenhouse gases should be regulated,” which was favored by only 31 percent.

·         79 percent – including 63 percent of Republicans and 74 percent of Independents -- support the EPA’s mission of “protect(ing) the air we breathe and the water we drink with safeguards that hold corporate polluters accountable for the pollution they release into our environment.”

The national survey by PPP for NRDC was conducted February 18-20, 2011, with a sample size of 784 registered voters and a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percent.  Full reports on the national and district-level polling results, including sample sizes, polling dates and the margin of errors associated with each of the surveys can be found at http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/paltman/2-23%20Poll%20Table.pdf and http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/paltman/2-23%20PPP%20Poll%20National%20and%20District%20Results.zip.

For all 20 of the national and Congressional District surveys, PPP conducted automated telephone surveys of registered voters   using voter lists provided by Aristotle Inc. At least three attempts were made to reach every potential respondent.

EDITOR'S NOTE:  A streaming audio replay of the news event will be available on the Web at http://www.nrdc.org as of 5 p.m. EST on February 23, 2011.


The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is an international nonprofit environmental organization with more than 1.4 million members and online activists. Since 1970, our lawyers, scientists, and other environmental specialists have worked to protect the world's natural resources, public health, and the environment. NRDC has offices in New York City, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Bozeman, MT, and Beijing. Visit us at www.nrdc.org and follow us on Twitter @NRDC.


Sign up for NRDC's online newsletter

See the latest issue >



NRDC Gets Top Ratings from the Charity Watchdogs

Charity Navigator awards NRDC its 4-star top rating.
Worth magazine named NRDC one of America's 100 best charities.
NRDC meets the highest standards of the Wise Giving Alliance of the Better Business Bureau.


Donate now >

Share | |