The Road to a Better Commute

Putting roadways on “diets” can make biking and driving safer at the same time.

September 10, 2015

Getting more people to bike to work is a win-win for the climate and public health. But the way many of our roads are designed makes choosing two wheels over four an accident waiting to happen. It doesn’t have to be that way. In this video, city planner Jeff Speck and 3-D artist Spencer Boomhower illustrate how updating existing roadways can easily make cycling safer without jamming up traffic.

The benefits aren’t just for pedal pushers, either—so-called “road diets” decrease car accidents and speeding, too. A new report out this week says cities around the globe could save $17 trillion by 2050 by promoting greener transportation. So biking is good for our bottoms and our bottom lines. 


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