Thousands of Americans Take Action to Save the Clean Power Plan

Activists across the country rallied, hosted listening sessions, and submitted public comments to advocate for carbon pollution limits from power plants.

NRDC staff rallying in support of the Clean Power Plan at San Francisco City Hall

Ian Tuttle for NRDC

Hundreds of NRDC activists and concerned citizens showed up at hearings in three cities last month to support the Clean Power Plan. The message was clear: The landmark plan is our best chance at reversing climate change by cutting carbon pollution. "We are experiencing the effects of climate change now—it's not something off in the future, " said one NRDC activist at the San Francisco public meeting.

The crowds reminded decision makers that the Clean Power Plan will accelerate the energy revolution that is already underway and ensure our clean energy future. More than three million Americans already work in wind, solar, and energy efficiency jobs—and that total is growing fast.

San Francisco's mayor, Mark Farrell, giving a speech on the steps of San Francisco City Hall to NRDC activists and concerned citizens supporting clean energy and climate action

Ian Tuttle for NRDC

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had initially scheduled only one public meeting on the Clean Power Plan in Charleston, West Virginia—the heart of coal country—but there was a public outcry calling for more meetings in other communities. In response, the agency added meetings in San Francisco and Kansas City, Missouri.

Annie Notthoff, NRDC's director of California advocacy for San Francisco and Sacramento, testifying before EPA administrators on the importance of the Clean Power Plan

Ian Tuttle for NRDC

Hundreds more also rallied at listening sessions in support of the Clean Power Plan in New York City; Annapolis, Maryland; and Wilmington, Delaware. And so far, 120,000 NRDC supporters have submitted public comments to the Trump administration in support of the Clean Power Plan.

But the fight to save the Clean Power Plan and our clean energy future is not over. There’s still time to make your voice heard before the public comment period closes on April 26.

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